Have you ever ridden a nag?

Have you ever ridden a nag?

“Nag” (jamelgo) is a noun referring to an old horse. So you may have ridden an old horse or a nag.

Nag is also a noun with a different meaning (rezongón, gruñón) as well as a verb (fastidiar). Mortals sometimes “nag someone” to do something and the “nagging” is sometimes a criticism.

Here are some examples:

  • Do not nag me (deja de fastidiarme/deja de darme la lata).
  • Stop nagging me (deja de molestarme)!
  • Mr. Podemos is nagging me to live in North Korea (…esta insistiéndome/molestándome que yo viva en …)
  • Sir Keir Starmer, the Labour Party Leader, is a terrible nag (…una latosa) or a “nagger”.

“Nagging” is also an adjective. Mortals often have “nagging doubts” (dudas persistentes). Two examples:

  • The German Chancellor has nagging doubts about the sanity (razón) of Mr. Putin, the Russian dictator.
  • Mr. Morales had nagging doubts (…tenia dudas perturbadoras…) about his decisión to buy a Ferarri.

So perhaps you have ridden a nag, been called a nagger or nag, nagged Mr. Sanchez to lower taxes, and had nagging doubts about living in North Korea.

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